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You never change something by fighting the existing reality. To change something, build a new model that makes the existing model obsolete.---Buckminster Fuller
Hollywood Critics “Stand Their Ground” Against Two New Black Indie Films
Posted | April 25, 2012 08:25 PM
When two independent Black films, “We the Party” and “Woman Thou Art Loosed On The 7th Day,” opened on consecutive weekends, thus entering the “gated community” of movie theaters, they encountered a hostility and suspicion by film critics analogous to the experience of Trayvon Martin, as Hollywood film critics “stood their ground.
http://newsone.com/2004134/warrington-hudlin-on-white-critics-black-film/?fb_ref=.T5cR-RDwosA.like&fb_source=timeline
#1.
Posted by Duvet | December 01,2013 07:31 AM
Unfortunately Black films that does NOT follow the bias and buffoon style story-telling that films like "Friday" and "Barbershop" will continue to face opposition by old and young executives in Hollywood because of Hollywood's natural and unashamed bias toward Black intellects.

There's a unyielding segment of Hollywood producers, directors and studio heads that prefer the unflattering images and misconceptions of "black folks"! It helps them feel better about not being the outcasts of Europe and the Middle East. So it is imperative to write and produce good film works that a larger portion of American black and white audiences desire and are willing to pay for it. The Butler, Best Man Holiday, 12 years a slave to name a few recent HITS by Black film-makers, clearly concludes that there is a marketplace for GOOD,CONTENT DRIVEN black film!

In fact, Hollywood does NOT have the FINAL say about who can produce or write a hit film anymore! However, black writers, producers and directors MUST continue to collaborate with like minded actors and investors (like Brad Pitt) and educate the international marketplace of potential investors and distributors so that the chokers and chains of Hollywood will never find their way around the necks, ankles, and wrists of talented black writers and producers ever again.
 

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Battle of Algiers
Director Gillo Pontecorvo's 1966 movie The Battle of Algiers concerns the violent struggle in the late 1950s for Algerian independence from France, where the film was banned on its release for fear of creating civil disturbances.
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Leba is a digital artist in residence in the BFF Lab where she has done groundbreaking work in developed her concepts for online interactive narratives that demonstrate how film can be integrated with the web to expand the narrative and engage the audience in new ways. Her first project, WEAPONS OF MISDIRECTION, was funded by the Nathan Cummings Foundation and went on to win the 2005 WEBBY for Best Political Website.
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