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Just when the caterpillar thought its life was over, it became a butterfly
Charlie Brown Kwanza
Posted | January 10, 2006 05:01 AM
The liberal use of the N world on Boondocks and by rappers have embolded whites to appropriate what has been the exclusive perogative of black American. Click on the video below and prepare yourself to laugh or be really angry. Don't forget to post your comments. http://ebaumsworld.com/videos/charliebrownkwanza.html
#1.
Posted by ljallen | January 13,2006 12:31 AM
After watching this rather silly parody, I was struck by how often "MF" and the "F" word were used. The N word doesn't occur nearly as often. I'm neither angry nor amused.

The video seems to be parodying the image of Rap and Hip Hop more than anything else. The overuse of vulgarity and profanity has always been a sign of a limited vocabulary and limited imagination--in this video and in Rap and/or Hip Hop. Therefore, it's not the N word that we should be worried about.

#2.
Posted by nell | January 13,2006 09:07 AM
There was so much fu@*ing cursing that I could barely understand what the f&#@ they were saying. The juxtoposition of the characters with the language was clever, but the video seemed to be a racist, stereotypical depiction of black folks (albeit in white bodies- poor white wiggers?). I did not have as much of a problem with 'nigga' as I did with the references to welfare, fellatio and pimping.
#3.
Posted by big_rod | January 13,2006 12:09 PM
Hey everyone, I agree with everything that Nell said. I'm just wondering if we are ever going to get away from the idea that these stereotypical ideologies are so chic and qool. Why are these views so fashionably qool???! Yes, there are Black people livin' every kind of life you can image, but what is this continuing and stiffling pre-occupation with the downright negative ones? Why must art always imitate the negative part of life when it comes to Blacks?

When I saw the ad for the movie Soul Plane of tv, I said to myself that "we have hit an all-time low". How the f**k did a movie like this get green-lighted and why did those Black actors in that movie thought this movie would be funny after reading the script? They did read the script didn't they?

I have a DVD called "TV In Black: The First Fifty Years" which takes a look at and examines the types of Black programming we've had over the course of fifty years. In the DVD, and in reference to the tv comedy series "Homeboys In Outer Space", Mo'Nique from The Parkers asked "Why are Black people so [overly] critical? Why do we as Black people have to pick things apart with a fine tooth comb?" The answer that I angrily gave along wiht a friend of mine who watched it with me was "...because television [or media in general for that matter] has a history of portraying Blacks in a less than positive and desirable light; very stereotypical and one-dimensional. We have not had the broad canvas of characters on tv that whites have." So, my million dollar question is: How many times are we going to sacrifice our self-respect in order to just "get paid" and leave a path of sub-par programming as a legacy.

Anyway, I also take it very personally that this Charlie Brown Kwanzaa cartoon decided to add Kwanzaa into the mix of this stereotypical cartoon. I'm an atheist and don't believe in any organizaed religion; I feel it's just another way to control people. However, Kwanzaa and its seven principles [to me] is the embodiment of simple common sense [which unfortunately is not common for everybody] and collectively working together as a community. Black people would be in a much better space if we spent more time putting into practice the seven Kwanzaa principles. No one is perfect and some days I fail myself, however, I try and pick myself up and try to do the right thing.

This Charlie Brown Kwanzaa cartoon is just another example of a less than desirablr product to be left behind as part of a legacy.

As an aspiring filmmaker who's now working over at BCAT [Brooklyn Cable Access Televsion] in NYC and working on a privately funded Public Service Announcement [PSA], I want to do right by us.

ROD
 

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